JOB OPPORTUNITIES

YOUTH SERVICES ROUNDUP

Happy Tuesday! We are well into Mental Health Awareness Month, and today I’m sharing some ideas and resources to support your own mental health and the wellness of the young people you serve. This month is all about encouraging conversations, sharing facts and ending stigma. As a librarian you can model healthy emotions and make sure your patrons have access to accurate mental health information. If you or a patron you encounter needs more assistance, there are lots of wonderful resources available, and we’ve rounded up some of them on our Mental Health Libguide:  https://ncls.libguides.com/mentalhealth/home

May’s Talking is Teaching theme is Worries – perfect for Mental Health Awareness Month! Download the newest content pack here:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/18lg-2MqlE-b8Mi1iWU__V0d0AqX_zhso?usp=sharing

Mental health and wellness for children starts with teaching them to identify and articulate the feelings that come with the ups and downs of life. Picture books are perhaps our best tools for allowing children to understand and name their feelings. Check out this Publisher’s Weekly article for some examples of how librarians have used picture books in storytimes to promote social emotional learning (SEL):

https://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/childrens/childrens-industry-news/article/89239-read-alouds-that-rock-sel-storytimes.html

Here’s a simple craft that could easily be incorporated into an SEL storytime!

PD Corner

TODAY – Hot Summer Picture Books 

Date: Tuesday, May 17, 2022

Time: 2:00pm 

Looking for the hottest upcoming summer picture books? Look no further. With their wit, whimsy, and ability to spark the imagination, picture books remain a constant source of inspiration for readers of all ages. Join Booklist’s Books for Youth senior editor Julia Smith in this free, hour-long webinar on Tuesday, May 17 at 2 p.m. ET / 1 p.m. CT featuring representatives from Charlesbridge, Abrams Books, Clavis Publishing, Penguin Random House Library Marketing, and Holiday House! 

Register: https://ala-events.zoom.us/webinar/register/3616510930984/WN_9GflcJSeTp6k_36DJUCwog 

TODAY – Introduction to Creating a Library Makerspace 

Date: Tuesday, May 17, 2022

Time: 2:00pm 

Creating a makerspace in your library can be a rewarding adventure for your patrons allowing them to learn about and work with new pieces of technology. However, it doesn’t come without its challenges. Join Jordan Smith, the manager of Buffalo and Erie County Library’s popular Launch Pad Makerspace, who will discuss the many considerations that go into developing a library makerspace. Jordan will cover topics such as selection of the items, funding and promotion of the space. There will also be discussion on things to avoid and surprises that came up along the journey. Participants will be able to ask any burning questions on building makerspaces in their own libraries. 

Register: https://wnylrc.org/workshops/454

Beginning Readers 101: Emergent Literacy Made Easy (Online)

Date: Wednesday May 18

Time: 11:00am

Are you lost in the sea of differing publisher leveling schemes, differing vocabulary standards, and the generally vast range of reading abilities at work in the Beginning Reader area of your collection? You’re not alone! The world of Early Readers is often as frustrating for parents as it is for us professionals.

In this interactive webinar program, Jill Burket Ragase will give you a variety of tools that you will be able to use to:

-Understand the challenges of the Emergent Reader market from the perspectives of publisher, buyer, and reader.

-Understand the leveling and coding systems used by several popular publishers and series.

-Improve your collection variety and depth

-Improve your shelving and reader’s advisory knowledge for emergent readers

Beginning Reader collections can be challenging both in terms of collection development and customer service. We will also discuss tips and tricks to help frustrated parents get their children on the road to independent reading.

You also still have time to check out the recordings from Jill’s previous sessions:

BOARD BOOKS 101 (AVAILABLE UNTIL 6/17)

STORYTIME STARTERS (AVAILABLE UNTIL 5/20)

Mental Health Awareness: Depression Relief

Date: Friday, May 20

Time: 10:00am

In this presentation we will seek to better understand what depression is and how it impacts our lives. Coping skills will also be introduced for better management of mental wellness.

Register: https://ncls.libcal.com/event/8943582

Support Summer Reading with your Gale NOVELny Resources 

Date: Tuesday, May 24, 2022 

Time: 2:00pm 

Your summer reading programs play an important role in encouraging students to keep their skills up and be better prepared for the new school year by engaging literacy skills. Your NOVELny resources can support these programs with additional reading materials to strengthen understanding of texts, engage readers with critical analyses of texts, and foster close reading of text. We’ll explore these ideas and more in this session 

Register: https://cengage.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_7AOwFM-ARM2EyhPBuujnMA

Mental Health Awareness: Take Care After COVID

Date: Friday, May 27

Time: 10:00am

In this presentation we will explore ways to navigate a new normal, at the various stages of the pandemic and what things might look like after. Coping skills will also be introduced for better management of mental wellness.

Register: https://ncls.libcal.com/event/8943605

YOUTH SERVICES ROUNDUP

Happy Wednesday! There’s a lot happening in May so let’s jump right in!

Summer Reading and Storywalks

Thank you to everyone who attended youth services workshops in April! All of the resources are available on the Summer Reading Libguide at https://ncls.libguides.com/summerreading

If you have StoryWalks planned for this summer, please fill out this Google form for each one so I can add them to our big map on the public-facing Summer Reading page! https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSe4zMhrPRhVeJVzIS1ZFp6X-UlXEUhsPFQRHY2Czk9gscsk3A/viewform?usp=sf_link

Our public Summer Reading page also has a regional events calendar – to have your events highlighted on it please send me announcements (or a link to where you share events with your community!) https://ncls.libguides.com/more/summer

May is Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month! 

Epic Reads has created this great list of YA books to highlight that will make putting up a display a breeze!

https://www.epicreads.com/blog/books-for-asian-pacific-american-heritage-month/

Available Now – Free Audiobooks all Summer Long!

AudioFile’s annual Sync program has started! All summer, teens can download two free audiobooks a week through Sora. Books must be downloaded during the week they are featured, but they do not expire. They will stay available on the Sora bookshelf until they are deleted by the patron. 

Free Virtual Conference Opportunity

The Libraries.Today National Forum is coming up beginning on May 16th, and will run for two weeks of virtual programming. While it is geared to school librarians, there are many wonderful speakers and sessions that you may find valuable! Check out the schedule and register at: https://forum.libraries.today/schedule/

PD Corner

Thursday, May 5, 2022, 11:30am Overview of the Performers and Programs Database 

Learn more about this statewide resource that can help your library locate in-person and virtual events and programs to support and enhance Summer Reading and Learning in 2022. Presented by Peter Kowalski, database manager for Performers and Programs. 

Register: https://nyslibrary.libcal.com/event/9025805

Thursday, May 12, 2022, 12pm Fall 2022 Librarian Preview with HarperCollins Childrens Books 

Join us at a FREE WEBINAR for a sneak peek at new picture, middle grade, and YA books coming in 2022 from HarperCollins Children’s Books. You will hear directly from special guests, including award-winning illustrator, ERIC VELASQUEZ (Going Places: Victor Hugo Green and His Glorious Book), bestselling author and The Decemberists’ frontman, COLIN MELOY (The Stars Did Wander Darkling), New York Times bestselling author JODI LYNN ANDERSON (Each Night Was Illuminated)! Plus catch a special message from Dr. Ibram X. Kendi on his remarkable new project honoring the works of Zora Neale Hurston. Don’t miss out on your chance to learn about great new books coming in Fall 2022 from HarperCollins Children’s Books 

Register:https://ala-events.zoom.us/webinar/register/9716503375019/WN_pXS2u0FKShOIhA3kk1JtxA?timezone_id=America%2FNew_York

Friday May 13, 10am Mental Health Awareness: The Many Faces of Anxiety (Online)

May is Mental Health Awareness Month, and NCLS is bringing back Jennifer Frary for another series of talks promoting mental health and wellness! In this presentation we will explore the various ways anxiety shows up in our lives. Coping skills will also be introduced for better management of mental wellness.

Each webinar in the series will include an interactive presentation as well as time for group discussion with your colleagues about the topic.

Register: https://ncls.libcal.com/event/8943575

Tuesday, May 17, 2022, 2pm Hot Summer Picture Books

Looking for the hottest upcoming summer picture books? Look no further. With their wit, whimsy, and ability to spark the imagination, picture books remain a constant source of inspiration for readers of all ages. Join Booklist’s Books for Youth senior editor Julia Smith in this free, hour-long webinar on Tuesday, May 17 at 2 p.m. ET / 1 p.m. CT featuring representatives from Charlesbridge, Abrams Books, Clavis Publishing, Penguin Random House Library Marketing, and Holiday House! 

Register:https://ala-events.zoom.us/webinar/register/3616510930984/WN_9GflcJSeTp6k_36DJUCwog 

Wednesday May 18, 11am Beginning Readers 101: Emergent Literacy Made Easy (Online)

Are you lost in the sea of differing publisher leveling schemes, differing vocabulary standards, and the generally vast range of reading abilities at work in the Beginning Reader area of your collection? You’re not alone! The world of Early Readers is often as frustrating for parents as it is for us professionals.

In this interactive webinar program, Jill Burket Ragase will give you a variety of tools that you will be able to use to:

-Understand the challenges of the Emergent Reader market from the perspectives of publisher, buyer, and reader.

-Understand the leveling and coding systems used by several popular publishers and series.

-Improve your collection variety and depth

-Improve your shelving and reader’s advisory knowledge for emergent readers

Beginning Reader collections can be challenging both in terms of collection development and customer service. We will also discuss tips and tricks to help frustrated parents get their children on the road to independent reading.

You also still have time to check out the recordings from Jill’s previous sessions:

BOARD BOOKS 101 (AVAILABLE UNTIL 6/17)

STORYTIME STARTERS (AVAILABLE UNTIL 5/20)

Wednesday, May 18, 2022, 6pm QPR (Question, Persuade, Refer) Gateway Training 

An excellent training for anyone who interacts with teens. Provides guidance on how to recognize warning signs and how to provide appropriate support and intervention for mental health struggles. Provided by Onondaga Free Library.

Register:https://onlibonondagafree.evanced.info/signup/EventDetails?EventId=10877&backTo=Calendar&startDate=2022/05/01

YOUTH SERVICES ROUNDUP

This past week, I was lucky enough to attend the YSS conference in Schenectady. While it’s a short conference, the day was jam packed with great sessions, a powerful keynote and lots of conversations with all kinds of librarians!

Chris Crutcher gave the keynote address. To my shame, I have yet to read one of his books and I didn’t know much about him going into the conference. However, he was a compelling speaker and storyteller and several of his books are now in my TBR pile! 

Ostensibly, his speech and sessions were about censorship, but what he really focused on were the stories of children he’s encountered in his career as an educator and family therapist. He has worked with kids who have endured unimaginably traumatic experiences, and his takeaway for us is that those kids are brave and brilliant in the ways that they have developed strategies to survive. The characters in his books all reflect real stories and personalities.

His books have been banned dozens of times over decades, and he talked about how book banning doesn’t hurt the author – it hurts the abused kids who miss out on reading something that lets them know they’re not the only one, LGBTQ+ kids who hear that their life experiences are in some way unacceptable or wrong, traumatized kids who lose access to language to explain and process what has happened to them. While so many of the current book banning efforts focus on preventing certain populations from feeling uncomfortable, he emphasized that fiction is a safe way for those kids to experience other perspectives and build empathy, while for kids who identify with the characters, fiction may be a life-saving affirmation.

He said something that I found really powerful: “Don’t take kids’ language away from them unless you have language that will work better for them”. If I’m being 100% honest, he was talking about profanity, but it resonated with a deeper meaning. Every child is grappling with something – whether it’s surviving abuse, developing their identity, or understanding the world around them. The language and stories in books allow them to learn and live vicariously, and give them tools to wrestle with problems and solutions in the privacy of their own minds. Censorship undermines an important survival tool for the kids who need it most.

Early Literacy Resource – Decodable Books with Teach My Kid to Read

Another session focused on decodable books for supporting beginning and struggling readers. Even with experience as an elementary school librarian, I hadn’t heard of decodable books. Unlike leveled readers, decodable books take a phonics approach, and focus on using words that kids can sound out to build skill and confidence before introducing other letter patterns. The purpose is to teach readers to decode words rather than guessing at the meaning based on context, pictures or predictable text. Decodable books can be used to help kids build up to leveled readers and authentic texts. The presentation was given by a non-profit called Teach My Kid to Read, which partners with public libraries to provide professional development on the learn-to-read process. If you would be interested in having us bring TMKTR to the North Country to lead a training, please let me know. 

Engaging Teens in the Library

The final session of the day was a joint presentation from two librarians who have successfully engaged teens in planning programming and completing service projects. They are both from huge libraries, but many of their ideas can be scaled down for use in smaller settings. 

Both libraries treat their teen programs as volunteer advisory groups rather than a series of unconnected programs. They recruited teens by working with their local school districts to post flyers, share events on the morning announcements, and identify students who might be interested. In both cases, teens were called on to plan the programs that were offered for their age group. While they had support from the librarians, they had to take responsibility for planning and promoting them. 

Colonie Library maintains a breakneck pace of programming, and has enough participants to form committees around upcoming events – their teens meet every Monday night for either a program, a committee meeting or their monthly planning meeting. While that kind of schedule is not realistic for a single-person library, the structure of having a standing date at which there will always be either a program or a meeting helps teens plan and sets the expectation for attendance. 

My favorite takeaway from this session was Colonie’s amazing list of past programs! These were all teen-run or teen-suggested.

If you would like to review the slides from all the conference sessions, or reach out to presenters for more information, YSS has compiled a Google Folder with resources from each session here!

Starting Soon – Free Audiobooks all Summer Long!

AudioFile’s annual Sync program is starting next week! All summer, teens can download two free audiobooks a week through Sora. Books must be downloaded during the week they are featured, but they do not expire. They will stay available on the Sora bookshelf until they are deleted by the patron. 

PD Corner

I CAN’T REACH IT! SHELVING AND LAYOUT IN THE CHILDREN’S DEPARTMENT WITH JILL BURKET RAGASE RESCHEDULED FOR APRIL 26TH! 

Following this webinar, attendees will be able to:

• Determine if their collection allocation and placement is maximized for youth patrons interest, demand, and convenience.

• Understand the impact of signage as a user experience and how to incorporate it effectively and efficiently in a space used by non-readers, emergent readers, and early readers.

• Orient their materials, shelving, and service points with young patrons in mind.

• Use space creatively.

We will tackle each topic with options for libraries with little to no budget, some budget, and big budgets for improvements.

If you would like to view recordings of the presentations she did for us last year, we have access to them for a few more months! 

BOARD BOOKS 101 (AVAILABLE UNTIL 6/17)

STORYTIME STARTERS (AVAILABLE UNTIL 5/20)

STORYWALKS JAM SESSION – APRIL 28 

By popular request, we will be holding an in-person, hands on workshop so you can get all your StoryWalks questions answered by your colleagues who’ve done it before, see examples from other libraries, and practice making a sample panel. 

FANTASTIC BOOKS (AND WHERE TO FIND THEM) – APRIL 29

Join us for a discussion about the best resources for book discovery and reviews, how to keep up with release dates, and what goes into maintaining a balanced, robust collection in a small community library. We’ll also talk about avoiding self-censorship and the importance of your collection development policy.

YOUTH SERVICES ROUNDUP

Happy Friday! Happy April! (It’s snowing outside my window right now but I can hope that we’re on the verge of spring!) It’s a busy month for youth services – planning for Summer Reading is in full swing, events are happening left and right, and there are quite a few celebrations and observations that could make for good library programs this month. 

April is National Poetry Month! Poets.org has extensive lists of suggested activities: https://poets.org/national-poetry-month/30-ways-celebrate-national-poetry-month

Easter is coming up! Given current world events, this is a wonderful time to share the joyful art of making Ukrainian eggs, or pysanky (PESS-en-keh). Legend has it that as long as pysanky are being made in the world, peace will prevail. As part of a storytime, pair the activity with Rechenka’s Eggs by Patricia Polacco, or P. Zonka Lays an Egg by Julie Paschkis. Children can create pysanky without any special tools, using crayons and food dyes. https://celebrationgeneration.com/easy-pysanky-how-to-aka-epic-easter-eggs/

April is also Child Abuse Prevention Month. The symbol used by Prevent Child Abuse America is a pinwheel, which in itself could be a good craft activity. The North Country Prenatal/Perinatal Council is running a coloring contest. Although only submissions from their service area (Jefferson, Lewis and St. Lawrence counties) will be eligible for prizes, the coloring sheets themselves are generic and support the message that every child deserves to be loved, cared for and protected. Download the sheets and entry instructions here. If you pair these with a storytime, children might benefit from titles like Rissy No Kissies by Katey Howes or Don’t Hug Doug (He Doesn’t Like It) by Carrie Finison, both of which gently introduce the theme of “my body is my own”. The theme also pairs well with titles about kindness or community helpers.

This month’s Talking is Teaching Theme is Counting! Download graphics, posters and tip sheets here.

PD CORNER

SUMMER READING PROGRAMMING PLANNING – APRIL 4 (IN PERSON AT MEXICO) AND APRIL 7 (VIRTUAL)

We’ll be talking about building a programming calendar, finding community partners, and marketing your program! Both sessions are open to library staff from all NCLS counties, but space in the in-person session is limited!

I CAN’T REACH IT! SHELVING AND LAYOUT IN THE CHILDREN’S DEPARTMENT WITH JILL BURKET RAGASE RESCHEDULED FOR APRIL 26TH! 

Following this webinar, attendees will be able to:

• Determine if their collection allocation and placement is maximized for youth patrons interest, demand, and convenience.

• Understand the impact of signage as a user experience and how to incorporate it effectively and efficiently in a space used by non-readers, emergent readers, and early readers.

• Orient their materials, shelving, and service points with young patrons in mind.

• Use space creatively.

We will tackle each topic with options for libraries with little to no budget, some budget, and big budgets for improvements.

If you would like to view recordings of the presentations she did for us last year, we have access to them for a few more months! 

BOARD BOOKS 101 (AVAILABLE UNTIL 6/17)

STORYTIME STARTERS (AVAILABLE UNTIL 5/20)

STORYWALKS JAM SESSION – APRIL 28 

By popular request, we will be holding an in-person, hands on workshop so you can get all your StoryWalks questions answered by your colleagues who’ve done it before, see examples from other libraries, and practice making a sample panel. 

FANTASTIC BOOKS (AND WHERE TO FIND THEM) – APRIL 29

Join us for a discussion about the best resources for book discovery and reviews, how to keep up with release dates, and what goes into maintaining a balanced, robust collection in a small community library. We’ll also talk about avoiding self-censorship and the importance of your collection development policy.

YOUTH SERVICES ROUNDUP

Happy Wednesday! Yesterday I got to meet quite a few of the librarians from Oswego County and tour Mexico Public Library (where we will be holding our Summer Reading session in just a couple of weeks!) I only had a minute to snap a few pictures, but these two ideas jumped out at me!

Everyone loves a take and make craft, and Mexico has paired theirs with a display of springtime titles (and a reminder that it’s okay to take books on display – I’m always surprised at how many patrons think they’re ruining a display by taking a book!)

I also love that they post examples of the crafts they’ve done during storytime. What a great way to give families a better sense of what kind of fun is in store for them!

QUICK AND EASY TEEN BOOK DISPLAYS

In a rut with your YA displays? Here are a few ideas to hopefully spark some inspiration!

http://yssevents.blogspot.com/2022/03/quick-and-easy-teen-book-displays.html

SPOTLIGHT ON MATERNAL MENTAL HEALTH

Please take a moment to review this important information about maternal mental health. You are in the perfect position to ensure that mothers visiting the library with their kids have easy access to information and help if they are struggling. Consider shelving some parenting and mental health books in your children’s space (a nice use of high shelves that kids can’t reach themselves anyway!) and have bookmarks or cards available with local and national resources and hotlines.

We Need to Talk About Maternal Mental Health | Vogue

Mad As A Mother: Reading To Understand The Maternal Mental Health Crisis

Maternal Depression-Making a Difference Through Community Action: A Planning Guide | Mental Health America

Help for Moms | Postpartum Support International (PSI)

SENSORY BINS FOR THE WIN!

Does your children’s room have a sensory bin? They’re inexpensive, easy to make, and give you endless opportunities for activities! You can change up the items, or just change the prompt – find something red, find something that starts with B, sort by size etc. – it’s endlessly flexible and you can use odds and ends that you probably already have! 

https://littlebinsforlittlehands.com/10-super-simple-rice-sensory-bins/

https://littlebinsforlittlehands.com/dye-rice-sensory-play-colored-rice/

PD CORNER

SUMMER READING PROGRAMMING PLANNING – APRIL 4 (IN PERSON AT MEXICO) AND APRIL 7 (VIRTUAL)

We’ll be talking about building a programming calendar, finding community partners, and marketing your program! Both sessions are open to library staff from all NCLS counties, but space in the in-person session is limited!

I CAN’T REACH IT! SHELVING AND LAYOUT IN THE CHILDREN’S DEPARTMENT WITH JILL BURKET RAGASE RESCHEDULED FOR APRIL 26TH! 

Following this webinar, attendees will be able to:

• Determine if their collection allocation and placement is maximized for youth patrons interest, demand, and convenience.

• Understand the impact of signage as a user experience and how to incorporate it effectively and efficiently in a space used by non-readers, emergent readers, and early readers.

• Orient their materials, shelving, and service points with young patrons in mind.

• Use space creatively.

We will tackle each topic with options for libraries with little to no budget, some budget, and big budgets for improvements.

If you would like to view recordings of the presentations she did for us last year, we have access to them for a few more months! 

BOARD BOOKS 101 (AVAILABLE UNTIL 6/17)

STORYTIME STARTERS (AVAILABLE UNTIL 5/20)

SAVE THE DATE: STORYWALKS – APRIL 28 (TIME AND LOCATION TBD) By popular request, we will be holding an in-person, hands on workshop so you can get all your StoryWalks questions answered by your colleagues who’ve done it before, see examples from other libraries, and practice making a sample panel. 

FANTASTIC BOOKS (AND WHERE TO FIND THEM) – APRIL 29

Join us for a discussion about the best resources for book discovery and reviews, how to keep up with release dates, and what goes into maintaining a balanced, robust collection in a small community library. We’ll also talk about avoiding self-censorship and the importance of your collection development policy.

YOUTH SERVICES ROUNDUP

Happy Friday! I apologize for not getting out a roundup last week, but I have a really good excuse – I was busy moving to Watertown! I am officially a North Country resident, and very happy about it!

PROGRAM IDEA: MICROWAVE MONDAYS

Let’s kick things off with an easy program idea that could be a take and make or even a fully virtual series on your social media: Microwave Mondays! Margaret Kingsport is the teen librarian at Fayetteville Free Library, and during the early days of the pandemic, she thought about how many kids might be at home eating cold or reheated food because they couldn’t safely cook for themselves. But if a kid can use their microwave, there are lots of great things they can actually cook independently, ranging from fudge to fried rice to scrambled eggs. 

To keep things really simple, just record yourself (or a young helper) doing each step of a microwave recipe, post it to your library’s social media, and ask viewers to tag the library if they make the recipe. 

If you want to get fancy with it, you could provide the shelf-stable ingredients in a bag along with a recipe card (maybe even pair this with a branded library mug Friends fundraiser?) 

A few tips: Kids should have an adult on hand the first time they attempt any of these recipes. Mugs or bowls will be HOT when they come out, so oven mitts are a must. Every microwave is different, so cooking times are approximate, and after the first few minutes you may want to cook in 10 or 20 second increments and check frequently. And a plate or saucer under the mug is smart for some recipes to prevent overflow messes. 

Be sure to check out Margaret’s examples on Instagram @fflteen, and here are some simple recipes to get you started: 

Cinnamon Roll in a Mug – i am baker

Microwave Macaroni and Cheese in a Mug – Kirbie’s Cravings

Microwave Peanut Butter Fudge {3 Ingredients} – Insanely Good

The Easiest Potato Soup Recipe (In A Mug!) – Gemma’s Bigger Bolder Baking

How to Make Homemade Tortilla Chips in the Microwave – Sinful Nutrition

Microwave Mug Pizza Recipe (with Video) | Bigger Bolder Baking

2 Minute Pancake In A Mug – Colleen Christensen Nutrition

BOOK CHALLENGE UPDATES

An important perspective on a sensitive topic: what is age-appropriate for teens? The author asks adults to put aside their discomfort and really consider what information and stories teens need access to during these years when they may be experiencing curiosity, fear, or shame about their bodies and identities.

Sex in Young Adult Books Is Age Appropriate

Support from the National Coalition Against Censorship

If you experience a book or program challenge, there is now a confidential national hotline to report it and help you through it. 

NCAC Launches Book Challenge Crisis Hotline and Censorship Database | News Bites | School Library Journal

QUICK FRIDAY SMILES

Seven year old Inara is reading half a dozen books or more each night, aiming to read every book in her public library’s picture book collection.

Read all about it: Seven-year-old aims to read 3,000 books

Better Nate Than Ever is coming to Disney+

Better Nate Than Ever Trailer Reveals New Disney+ Musical Comedy

For the book geek in all of us, the New York Times explains how a book is made

How a Book Is Made – The New York Times

YOUTH SERVICES ROUNDUP

Happy snowy Friday! I hope you got to enjoy the little bit of warmth and sunshine we got earlier this week – we’ve almost made it through February and we can anticipate longer, warmer days coming soon. Have an extra cup of tea or cocoa today and hang in there!

TALKING BOOKS WITH RELUCTANT READERS

I bet you’ve experienced this: a parent approaches your desk with a fidgety, uncomfortable-looking child in tow and says, “Can you help her find a book for independent reading?” You ask the child what she’s looking for, and she avoids eye contact, mumbling, “I don’t read”. 

Challenge accepted.

Kids may not see themselves as readers for a variety of reasons. They may struggle with reading difficulties and have feelings of failure, shame and exclusion associated with books. They may not have been read to by the adults in their lives and lack the experience of immersion in a shared story. They may be burned out on reading titles that they didn’t get to choose themselves. As librarians, we have the opportunity to give every child a positive, non-judgmental path to a book that just might light a fire in them. 

You won’t always have the opportunity to build a relationship before being called on to recommend a book, but by turning the conversation to the things that the child does love you can gather some clues. Ask about favorite hobbies, characters, games and other interests that make them unique. Would they prefer to escape into a fantasy, be creeped out by horror, or empathize with someone going through similar real life events? You won’t sell a kid on a book by making them feel like it’s something they “should” enjoy. If you demonstrate that you respect their opinions and preferences and work hard to find a book that fits just right, you model the ways in which books, stories and literature serve our lives, not the other way around.

Through your conversations with young patrons, you can also help them develop their ability to articulate what they like. Become familiar with vocabulary to describe stories, and practice applying it to your own reading (you may get better at pinning down your own tastes as well!) Olga Nesi calls these terms “appeal factors” while Novelist uses the word “story elements”. This is a great guide to review to build your own arsenal of descriptors.

I often share with kids my own experience of going through a period of being unenthusiastic about reading because I kept trying to pick up bestsellers that just weren’t for me. It took trial and error for me to learn that I prefer realistic fiction with deep character development that makes me look at my world from a new angle (and humor is a plus). It is good for kids to see that even the most voracious readers don’t love every book, and that there is nothing wrong with them if they haven’t found their niche yet – and being there to support them while they find it is a tremendous privilege. 

When I think I’ve found a book that a kid will like, before I check it out to them, I look them in the eye and say “If you hate this, I want you to bring it right back and tell me why, so we can find you something that’s a better fit. If you love it, I want you to come right back and tell me why, so we can find more!” 

Here are some resources for helping readers of all ages find the right books for them and build a reading habit:

A simple introduction to appeal factors and how to dig into what a reader liked about a given story

A few titles to keep in your back pocket if you suspect that traditional text is not the best fit for a child (also keep in mind novels in verse and graphic novels)

Great tips, whether you’re getting back into reading or building a reading practice for the first time

BOOK CHALLENGE NEWS AND A CALL TO ACTION

BookRiot is keeping up with developing book challenges around the country, and this is a useful compilation of updates and concrete suggestions of how to help. 

DIPPING A TOE INTO TIKTOK

Intimidated by TikTok? …*raises hand* 

Let’s face it – teens are on TikTok, and if your library isn’t you are missing a way to put your services in front of them and connect with what they care about. This blog post will give you a bit more information to help you decide whether to give it a try. If your library is already using TikTok, please hit me up because I would love to feature you in a future Roundup!

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YOUTH SERVICES ROUNDUP

Happy Friday!

This week I had the opportunity to visit Flower Library and take in a storytime. It was actually my first time in this library and I was stunned by the grandeur of the building and the variety of programming that this talented team of librarians has going on. Click to access a slideshow of cool ideas (and a few pretty photos of the building because I just can’t get over it!) I will endeavor to share out the amazing things happening at each library I visit, and if you have a program or idea worth shouting about please invite me to come check it out!

INTELLECTUAL FREEDOM

Author Adib Khorram reflects on what’s at stake as diverse books are increasingly challenged – for authors and for the young people who need those books. Sharing his own experience as an LGBTQ+ Iranian-American, he writes, “I grew up not knowing that I could even be an author. I didn’t see media with Iranians, except as terrorists…I grew up thinking that being gay meant that I was going to live a sad life…” Read the article at: https://www.kcur.org/arts-life/2022-02-13/a-kansas-city-ya-author-worries-what-kids-lose-when-books-like-his-own-get-banned

WEEDING YA NONFICTION

http://yssevents.blogspot.com/2022/02/throw-it-thursday-what-teens-dont-read.html

PROGRAMMING FOR TWEENS

How can libraries help young patrons bridge the transition from children’s services to young adult programs? The ALSC blog has some advice for being intentional about creating programming to keep kids engaged through their tween years: https://www.alsc.ala.org/blog/2022/02/thinking-about-tweens/

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YOUTH SERVICES ROUNDUP

FREE STUFF – CHILDREN’S BOOK WEEK THEME AND POSTER REVEALED!

Every Child a Reader and the Children’s Book Council have announced the 2022 Children’s Book Week slogan, “How Do You Book?” This year’s event will take place May 2–8 and November 7–13. Two posters per registrant are free, and bookmarks and additional activities will be available as well!

STORYTIME INSPIRATION

Literacious offers up a wealth of ideas for storytimes including themed songs, activities, stories, movement and crafts! Choose Activities in the top menu to view themes by age level bands. If you’re still looking for storytime ideas for February, check out the Black History Month theme which offers up book and song suggestions! 

JUST FOR FUN

Tell Us Your Encanto Opinions And We’ll Give You A Perfect Book Recommendation (buzzfeed.com)

GEARING UP FOR SUMMER READING

NCLS will be hosting some Summer Reading sessions with an emphasis on programming, but we need your help to plan! Please fill out this Google Form to let us know your meeting preferences! If you attended our first meeting last Friday, your CSLP gear is on its way! If you did not receive a flash drive loaded with the Collaborative Summer Library Program manual but would like one, please let me know.

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YSS Spring Conference: Early Bird registration deadline 2/18, Scholarship application deadline extended to 2/15!

NYS Library: Getting Started with READsquared This is the first of several free sessions hosted by the New York State Library, aimed at helping you get comfortable with setting up and using the control room in READsquared.

Youth Services Roundup

Happy sunny Monday, amazing North Country librarians! 

I’m Katie St. Laurent and I am your new Youth Services and Outreach Consultant. I’ve been working at NCLS for all of five days, and I’m already so impressed with the creativity, dedication and enthusiasm of the librarians in this region. I’m excited to support you all in any way I can!

Posing with Aggie, Willow, and last year’s Summer Reading shirt!

Some fun facts about me!

  • I have been a school librarian for the past 10 years, most recently at Solvay High School. I’ve also been a substitute librarian at Onondaga Free Library for the past three years!
  • I am an animal lover – my husband and I have a whole menagerie of mammals, reptiles, birds and fish.
  • I do triathlons in the summer, and even started a triathlon club for students at Solvay.
  • I shaved my head for St. Baldrick’s in 2017 and loved it so much that I kept a buzzcut – you never know what color my hair will be!

SUMMER READING PLANNING

We had our first Summer Reading information session on Friday and shared tons of great ideas and information! If you missed it, not to worry – we will have a second session well in advance of summer, and I am always available to sit down with you individually to help brainstorm and problem-solve!

Visit the Collaborative Summer Reading Program website for information including graphics and promotional materials here: https://www.cslpreads.org/

The Summer Reading at New York State Libraries website provides a wealth of ideas, information, resources and links to get you started: https://www.summerreadingnys.org/

IN KAHOOTS – TRIVIA PROGRAMS MADE EASIER

Kahoot is a web-based program that makes running a trivia competition super easy and fun! You create multiple choice questions, launch the game, and players respond using their phones to buzz in! Points are awarded based on the number of correct answers and on how fast players respond. More from the ALSC blog: https://www.alsc.ala.org/blog/2022/02/true-or-false-kahoot-is-the-answer-to-family-fun-at-your-library/

LET’S TALK ABOUT…LOVE

February’s Talking is Teaching theme is Love! Check out posters, parent tip sheets, social media content, and more in this shared folder.

SPEAKING OF LOVE

Who doesn’t love a versatile, easy and practically free Valentine’s Day craft? Check out these adorable papercraft heart garlands! https://greenweddingshoes.com/diy-paper-heart-garland/

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How to Talk to Children and Teens about Race with Karissa Sullivan – Greenburgh Public Library

New and Upcoming Kids Books with Charlie Kelly – RRLC (choose NNYLN as your 3Rs Council)

YSS Spring Conference – Scholarship Deadline Extended to 2/15!